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Category: Stories

Declaration of Independence

Five Myths About American Independence Day

This week, on the fourth of the month, we celebrate the United States’ Independence from Great Britain. But, as with much of history, there is a difference between truth and tradition. Here are a few. The Declaration of Independence Was Signed on July 4, 1776 No lesser personages than Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, and Thomas…
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Juneteenth Memorial Monument at George Washington Carver Museum in Austin, Texas.

Juneteenth 2019

Juneteenth is the oldest memorial observed across the country to commemorate the end of slavery in the United States. The comes from the combination of June Nineteenth, when Major Granger arrived at Galveston, Texas, with news that the Civil War was over, and the quarter-million slaves in Texas were finally freed. The celebration began in…
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Stonewall 50 logo

Honoring Our LGBTQ Ancestors

As we celebrate 50 years since the Stonewall Riots, this year’s LGBTQ Pride Month is more significant than ever. It is a well-established fact that ever since there have been humans on the earth, there have been LGBTQ people. Noted historian John Boswell traced our history from our unions in Greco-Roman times to the Church-sanctified…
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The Reluctant DNA Match

We’ve all been there. You open up your account and see new DNA matches. You find one that is relatively close. You excitedly jot off a note, explaining who you are, what you believe the relationship is (if you know it) or how you might be related, and your willingness to share information. Then you…
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Sons of the American Revolution application.

My SAR Journey: The Application

Completing the application takes some time, but it is not overwhelming. Before starting to fill out the application form, be certain that you have completed all research. You will need a copy of your birth certificate and, if you are married, your marriage certificate. For every generation back from you to the Revolutionary War ancestor…
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Cover of Quebec During the American Invasion, 1775 to 1776, published in 2005.

My SAR Journey: Service

Some French-Canadians joined the Americans in fighting against the British, fighting side-by-side with those who were not that long ago their sworn enemies. Many joined militias in the colonies that bordered Canada, especially in New York. Those who have French-Canadian ancestors who appeared early (prior to 1850) in the United States should look or evidence…
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SAR Website

My SAR Journey: The Beginning

Aside from family associations, French-Canadians do not have a large number of lineage societies. Part of that may come from the fact that, compared to the United States, Canada has a relatively peaceful history. Thus there are few opportunities for those of us of French-Canadian descent to join one of these groups. Recently, however, this…
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Early twentieth-century obituaries.

Have You Written Your Obituary Yet?

Genealogists are obsessed with finding our family’s stories. We spend countless hours combing through records, attempting to recreate our ancestors’ lives. If we’re lucky we find letters or diaries that give us an insight into who our ancestors were. Unfortunately, it is all too often the case that there is no surviving correspondence or diary.…
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Boston Globe front page, January 16, 1919, describing the molasses tank explosion.

Centennial of a Disaster: The Great Molasses Flood

Just past noon, one hundred years ago today, a storage tank owned by the United States Industrial Alcohol Company. The 2.3 million gallons (8,706 tons) of molasses contained within it immediately started sweeping out like a tidal wave, destroying everything in its path. Horses, wagons, automobiles, buildings, and even the elevated railway line were destroyed.…
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Portrait of Eloi Morin in World War One Army Uniform.

World War I Private Éloi Morin

Éloi Morin was born 10 September 1887 in the small town of Saint Calixte de Kilkenny, Quebec, about 35 miles north of Montreal. He was the fifth son of Onésime Morin and his second wife Céline Pelletier. Onésime and Céline had eleven children between 1876 and 1894. The family included two older sons of Onésime…
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